RRGwrites

On life…and learning

Posts Tagged ‘Experiences

This New Year, Let’s Find God Within Us All…

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imageFifteen long years ago, around the same year-end time, I had read this heart-touching story. I was deeply moved; and as a habit, noted it down in my diary. As a young lad, this story left a deep impression upon me at the time and since then, I start my each new year reminiscing it.

This year, as all of us get ready to usher the new year in, I am sharing this piece with you: 

One cold evening during the holiday season, a little boy about six or seven was standing out in front of a store window. The little child had no shoes and his clothes were mere rags. A young woman passing by saw the little boy and could read the longing in his pale blue eyes. She took the child by the hand and led him into the store. There she bought him some new shoes and a complete suit of warm clothing.

They came back outside into the street and the woman said to the child, “Now, you can go and have a very happy holiday.”

The little boy looked up at her and asked, “Are you God, Ma’am?”

She smiled at him and replied, “No, son. I am just one of His children.”

The little boy then said, “I knew you had to be some relation.”

Touching, isn’t it? This story helped me stay more human year on year, welcoming the new year on a nicer note… I wish you all a very happy new year 2017; hope that you find your reasons and means to show you are the chosen one by the Lord Almighty to play His children, same way as the young lady in the story.

God bless you all…

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Written by RRGwrites

December 30, 2016 at 7:45 PM

That Tree Still Shakes Delhi…

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Circa 1984.

“Some riots took place in the country following the murder of Indiraji. We know the people were very angry and for a few days it seemed that India had been shaken. But, when a might tree falls, it is only natural that the earth around it does shake a little.”

 – Rajeev Gandhi; 19 November 1984, Prime Minister designate

Circa 2005.

“I have no hesitation in apologizing not only to the Sikh community but the whole Indian nation because what took place is the negotiation of the concept of nationhood, as enshrined in our Constitution. On behalf of our government, on behalf of the entire people of this country, I bow my head in shame that such a thing took place.”

– Dr. Manmohan Singh; 11 August 2005, the then Prime Minister, served India till year 2014

It is 2016 now.

That same tree continues to haunt the streets of Delhi and no apology from anyone whatsoever has helped the cause of justice as yet.

As the seekers of justice gather today and lament the delay in justice in the matter of over 3000 citizens of a minority community massacred over three days in 1984 in broad daylight on the roads of Delhi, I am deeply anguished and saddened to wake up to a morning 32 years later from the day this ghastly event manifested in the most barefaced manner on the streets of Delhi.

Well, didn’t someone say justice delayed is justice denied? May be, the phrase wasn’t meant for the commoners in India…

Authors Manoj Mitta and HS Phoolka, the tireless warriors for justice in the matter and conceivably the most knowledgeable people on this case, wrote in their well-researched book, ‘When A Tree Shook Delhi: The 1984 Carnage and its Aftermath’:

“Whichever way you look at India, whether as the world’s largest democracy, or as one of the fastest growing economies in the world, it is hard to imagine that any genocide could have taken place a few years ago right in its capital.”

Well, it did happen. And it is no solace that the masterminds and perpetrators of this rather well organized crime roam so freely, to date.

How I wish the apology of our last Prime Minister translated into actions. To a commoner like me, that would have been far more reassuring.

Not to be, as yet. The fight is on…

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are author’s own and not of the organisation he is associated with.

शहीदों के विचार…

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bhagat_singh_1929_140x190आज शहीद सरदार भगत सिंह का 110वां जन्मदिवस है – एक तरीक़े से, आज शहीद उत्सव है।

मैं आपसे शहीद भगत सिंह का उनके अंतिम समय का एक कथन
बाँटना चाहता हूँ; ना जाने क्यों आज मुझे यह बहुत याद आ रहा है –

“ऊषा काल के दीपक की लौ की भांति बुझा चाहता हूँ। इससे क्या हानि है जो ये मुट्ठी भर राख विनष्ट की जाती है। मेरे विचार विद्युत की भांति आलोकित होते रहेंगे…”

कितना गंभीर और निश्छल, परन्तु सत्य वचन है; और इतिहास इस बात का साक्षी है कि उनके विचार आज भी हमें आलोकित करते है…

आईये, आज सोचें कि क्या हमारे आचरण में, विचारों में इतना तेज है कि वो हमारे जाने के बाद भी याद किये जायेंगे और लोग उनका अनुसरण करेंगे?

Written by RRGwrites

September 27, 2016 at 11:01 AM

What I Learnt From My ‘Not-So-Great’ Bosses…

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Lessons Learned RRGwrites

We all love to talk about our Bosses, don’t we? And Lord knows, a minority of of us would regard our bosses as good leaders. When I wrote my earlier blog – ‘What My Great Bosses Taught Me’ – many of the readers asked me, “Hey, what about the bad bosses?”

So here it is…

The matter of fact is, I never had a really bad boss. Truly! That said, I have had my fair share of bad apples – a very insecure boss, another one who was ill-mannered and one who was simply incompetent for his job. However, none of them were awful enough for me to either loather or run away from them. In fact, I performed better under a couple of them, and was more successful under one of the tougher nuts.

There are many things I learnt from my great managers. The earlier blog enlists those. However, I learnt lot many more things from my, should I say, not-so-great bosses. A learning that proved invaluable in my later years; both, as a professional and as a people leader. Some of them were very simple, practical things and few were too profound a learning…

They are:

  1. Don’t reply to an unfavourable email in a hurry; wait till evening at least. That helps my hyper-reaction settle down and choice of words become calmer!
  2. You may be really intelligent and smart and all that, no point over-fighting your peers – functional or cross-functional. Even though they may not be able to score a point over you, they will end up despising you – something that won’t do good to the professional image in later years. From this boss, I learnt the value of building a truly well-knit peer-group, which may not be my besties, but wouldn’t despise me either.
  3. No one comes to work to do a bad job. No one joins office thinking they will give their worst that day. Keeping this in mind made me practice empathy and statesmanship, even when I was right and others were grossly wrong.
  4. Harsh language never helped the cause. If you are younger and more successful than your peers, you need to not oversell it. Success is a lousy teacher and it encourages arrogant behaviour and as rash tongue. Worse, even if you are right in what you say, how you say that will be picked, and surely used against you. Here, I learnt to be firm, yet stay polite. A learning that has held me in good stead since then.
  5. I learnt the craft of managing very senior management employees from one of my most difficult bosses. He was really good at this. I learnt the art of polite persistence, presentation skills to a senior audience group as well as how to handle tough questions from them, specifically those whose answer I didn’t know!
  6. Never work for a powerless boss. This is a great life/career-saving tip I received from one such a boss. I have written in detail about this learning here
  7. One must not feel insecure when your subordinate’s stars are shining brighter than yours. I once had a very insecure manager, who, despite being extremely competent functionally, was extremely inhibited in front of smarter juniors. He would simply feel threatened! My learning was a life-long one; that the key to success for any deputy is to do such good work that his boss gets promoted and recommends him for taking his spot! I have written in detail about this learning here…
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